Fischer Bros & Leslie 230 W 72 St. New York, NY 10023 212-787-1715 OU-Glatt
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DO NOT LEAVE MEAT THERMOMETER IN OVEN !

If you have purchased your meat thermometer from us, you have purchased an accurate cooking thermometer. One of the reasons it is more accurate than others is that you do not leave it in the oven and cook it each time it is used. The plastic dial will melt if the thermometer is left in the meat during roasting.

USING YOUR THERMOMETER

Based upon the cut and size of your meat, estimate the cooking time (ask your butcher!). About Ĺ hour before you think the meat will be done, take its temperature by opening the oven, slide out the rack, insert the thermometer into the center of the thickest portion of the meat. Wait for the dial to stop moving and note the temperature. At this point it should be below your target temperature.

Remove the thermometer and check again in 15 to 30 minutes depending on how close it was to the desired temperature. When you have reached the desired temperature remove the meat from the oven. Most meats are best left to stand for about 10 minutes in a warm area. This allows the juices which have been concentrated in the center of the meat to redistribute as the meat begins to cool and makes for a juicier roast (rather than a plate full of juice if cut too soon).



ROASTING TIMES AND TEMPERATURES

Roasting is a slow method of cooking and will generally result in a tender product. Most roasting should be done at 325 to 350 degrees F. Some recipes suggest a much higher temperature at the beginning for several minutes and then reducing the heat to roasting temperature. For roasts, steaks, London broils and turkeys and other large cuts, take out of the refrigerator one or two hours before roasting so the meat is not ice cold when you begin cooking. This will allow the meat to cook more evenly.

FOR BEEF: RARE 125 F MEDIUM 130 -135 WELL DONE 140+
FOR VEAL: 130 - 135 F (Please note veal will dry out very quickly be careful not to overcook)
FOR IANíS LAMB ROAST: 140- 145 F

FOR TURKEY / POULTRY: IN THICKEST PART OF BREAST BUT NOT TOUCHING BONE - 165 deg F or In the inside of the thigh 180 deg F.

Tip for turkey, when raw the drumstick joint will be loose, as it cooks it will stiffen up. When it starts to get loose again, your turkey should be done.

Another Turkey Tip - If you are stuffing your turkey, you can gently separate the breast skin from the breast by inserting your hand from the open cavity side. You can then gently push stuffing between the skin and the breast meat and smooth out the lumps. It makes your turkey look big and impressive and also helps prevent the white meat from drying out - when done cut stuffing and skin off in one piece and platter and slice (we fight over this in our home!)

IF YOU ARE STUFFING YOUR POULTRY THE STUFFING MUST BE AT LEAST 145 F. THIS IS THE MINIMUM INTERNAL TEMPERATURE FOR ALL POULTRY FOR HEALTH REASONS.
Meat Thermometer and Roasting Instructions